How to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking, Part 2

By | October 18, 2017

Welcome to the conclusion of my mini series on how to use patterned paper in cardmaking.  Over these past four blog posts I’ve explored ways to use pattern paper when making handmade cards.  Today we are going to see how to use several designer paper patterns together on one card.

 

My first card uses pattern paper to cover the bottom two-thirds of the card front.  The top part is left available for stamping.

How to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

DESIGN NOTES:

  • The pattern paper covers 2 3/4″ of the 4″ height of this card.  I left the top for stamping my sentiment.  I could have also chosen to stamp the sentiment on another piece of card stock, use a die cut and then attach it to the card front.
  • Notice how I used a strip of coordinating designer paper to create a narrow, contrasting border piece.
  • Designer paper used: Pick a Pattern (144163).

 

Here’s another card that combines two pieces of coordinating designer paper from the Coffee Break Designer Series paper pack (144155).

How to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

DESIGN NOTES:

  • The two pieces of designer paper create the backdrop for this focal image.  Stampin’ Up! designer paper packages make is easy to find papers that go together because each paper is designed to coordinate with the other sheets in the pack.
  • Designer paper sizes are 2″ and 3 1/4″.  I used a piece of Soft Sky 3/8″ Classic Weave Ribbon (144160) over the paper seams.

 

Here’s my last card that shows how to use patterned paper in cardmaking.  It combines two pieces of pattern paper just as the last card did.

How to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

 

DESIGN NOTES:

 

Interested in my other blog posts in this mini series?  Here are links:

Ways to Use Pattern Paper in Cardmaking, Part 1

Ways to Use Pattern Paper in Cardmaking, Part 2

How to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking, Part 1

If this series has inspired you, remember that Stampin’ Up! has an awesome designer paper sale going on during the month of October!  You can find the Stampin’ Up! Sale details here, and shop my online store here.

Designer paper is a “must have” in my craft room.  I use it in so many ways on the handmade cards I create.  I hope you have enjoyed my mini series on how to use patterned paper in cardmaking.  I’d love it if you’d comment below and share one take away you’ve learned that you’d like to try in your cardmaking!!

How to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

By | October 16, 2017

This post is part three in a mini series on how to use patterned paper in cardmaking.  The Stampin’ Up! Designer Series Paper packs contain gorgeous pattern papers that add beauty to your handmade cards.

So far, we’ve looked at:

 

As I said in my post on using designer paper as a background, Stampin’ Up! paper has so many GORGEOUS designs that contain stand-alone images.  My cards today use these kinds of papers as a secondary focal point.

Here’s the first card that uses Whole Lot Of Lovely Designer Paper (144110).

How to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

DESIGN NOTES:

  • One “trick” to using designer papers on your handmade greeting cards is to coordinate the solid color cardstock with the colors in the designer paper.  On this card, I pulled out the Pool Party and Tranquil Tide colors.  Coordinating the colors brings unity to the card design.
  • To make the paper more of a focal point, I cut a wider strip of pattern paper and placed it in the center of the card front.

 

Here’s another card that uses the same principles:

How to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

DESIGN NOTES:

  • I used a wider piece of the Be Merry designer paper (144111) on this card.  Notice how I used the same concept of a larger pattern paper piece, but changed the side of the card I placed in on.  Also, I didn’t extend this piece all the way from the top to the bottom of the card front like I did on my first card.
  • Check out this card that shows how to use patterned paper in cardmaking using the exact same layout as this card.

 

You can also use a narrower strip of designer paper as your secondary focal image.  The designer paper strip on this card looks more like a border, but also serves as a focal piece.  This card was made by Brenda Cardinal.

How to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

DESIGN NOTES:

  • Here’s another trick to use:  matte the designer paper with a piece of coordinating plain color cardstock, leaving just a narrow border.  To get a narrow border of this size, cut the width of the designer paper 1/8″ LESS than the cardstock size.
  • Designer paper used: Painted Autumn (144613)

 

Here’s the final card I have for you today.

How to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

DESIGN NOTES:

  • I placed the designer paper strip all the way to the edge of the Whisper White cardstock piece, almost like a border.  But notice how I incorporated it into the layout as a secondary focal image.

 

I hope you have enjoyed learning more of how to use patterned paper in cardmaking.  Make sure to stop back Wednesday as I have one more post of pattern paper card ideas to share with you.  See you then!!

Ways to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking, Part 2

By | October 11, 2017

Stampin’ Up!  has a fantastic designer paper sale going on right now.  Because of this,  I’ve decided to do a mini blog series on ways to use patterned paper in cardmaking.  In my last post, we learned how to use patterned paper as card front backgrounds.  Today, I’m sharing tips and trick for using pattern paper to create borders.

DESIGNER PAPER TIP:  The number of border pieces you get out of a strip of designer paper depends on the orientation of your card (landscape or portrait).  You can get FOUR 4″ portrait pieces from a strip of 12″ paper or TWO 5 1/2″ landscape pieces. NOTE: if you choose to have 4 1/4″ length portrait pieces, you will only get THREE from a strip.

 

Here’s my first card.  It uses a strip of Quilted Christmas designer paper (144617).

Ways to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

DESIGN NOTES:

  • The width of this pattern paper border piece was determined by the paper pattern design.  I cut one row of the design to create this border.  The length of this paper border is 4 1/4″.  You can see it goes from edge to edge on the card front.
  • Other card elements were made using the Quilt Builder Framelits Dies (144673) and the Layering Squares Framelits Dies (141708).
  • The pattern paper border helps to bring attention to the square focal image on this card.

 

Here’s a second card that uses a portrait orientation.  It has a 4″ long pattern paper strip.

Ways to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

DESIGN NOTES:

  • The Eastern Palace Specialty Designer Paper border (144147) on this card has a gold foil matte piece behind it.  Matting the pattern paper border helps to define the border and make the pattern paper “pop” and stand out.
  • The gold foil matte around the black cardstock coordinates with the gold foil matte behind the pattern paper border, bringing unity to the card design.
  • Other card elements were created with the Night in Bethlehem stamp set (Wood 144809, Clear 145282).

 

The last two cards I’m sharing today show more ways to use patterned paper in cardmaking.  Both of these cards use the landscape orientation.

 

Here’s one card:

Ways to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

DESIGN NOTES:

  • As I did in the card above, the Spooky Night Designer Series paper strip (144610) on the card was matted, this time using a piece of Basic Black cardstock.  The matte piece gives definition to the patterned paper, as well as coordinating with the other Basic Black elements on the card.
  • Pumpkin image and sentiment is from the Seasonal Chums stamp set (Wood 144945, Clear 144948).
  • Here’s how I colored in the pumpkin.  I used Clear Wink of Stella (141897) to add some sparkle to the face (hard to see in the photo).

Ways to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

 

Here’s my final designer paper border card.

Ways to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

DESIGN NOTES:

  • The pattern paper border goes across the center of this card, drawing the eye into the center focal image.  Your border doesn’t have to be continuously visible to be a border!!
  • Other new products used: Labels to Love stamp set (Wood 144970, Clear 144967), Everyday Label Punch (144668), Leaf Punch (144667).

If you’d like to know more about the sale on Stampin’ Up! designer paper click here.

Then, stop back next Monday when I will continue to explore ways to use patterned paper in cardmaking. 

Ways to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

By | October 9, 2017

It’s easy to create great looking cards when you use patterned paper to create an impact.  Today I’m beginning a mini series on ways to use patterned paper in cardmaking.  Currently Stampin’ Up! has a fantastic sale on select packs of their Designer Series Paper.  So….

I though it would be fun to explore different ways to use patterned paper in cardmaking.

The simplest way to create stunning cards is to use a piece of designer series paper as the background for your sentiments or stamped images.  Here’s an example

Ways to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

DESIGN NOTES:

  • Sometimes the patterned paper has beautiful, stand-alone images that are perfect for card backgrounds.  That’s the case for the sunflower paper piece in the Painted Autumn Designer Series Paper pack (144613).
  • This card was easy to make, because all it needed was to have a sentiment added.  I used a greeting from the Happy Birthday Gorgeous stamp set (143662).
  • To make the sentiment more of a focal point, I used Layering Oval Framelits. (141706 )
  • Other details to note: Notice the narrow cardstock matte behind the designer paper.  This helps to “pop” the paper and make it stand out.  I also added a piece of 1/4″ Copper Trim ribbon (144179) as an accent.
  • Designer Paper Size: 3 3/4″ x 4 3/4″ ;  Matte Size:  3 7/8″ x 4 7/8″

 

Here’s another card that uses pattern paper as a background.

Ways to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

DESIGN NOTES:

  • Symmetric patterned paper also works well for a card front background and helps the stamped images to stand out.   This designer paper is from the Merry Little Christmas Designer Series Paper pack (144621).
  • The stamped candles from the hostess exclusive Merry Patterns stamp set (144973) make a great focal point for this card.  Notice how the lines on the background design paper help to make the image pop.
  • Tips for using 12″ x 12″ sheets for card backgrounds: If you cut your background piece 5 1/4″ x 4″, you can get 6 card fronts from each sheet of designer paper.  Determine the direction in which you want your pattern paper to be cut (portrait or landscape).  Make the two 5 1/4″ cuts first, and you will have a leftover  1 1/2″ paper strip to use on other projects.  Then, cut each of the three wide strips into 4″ lengths.

 

My final card uses TWO pieces of patterned paper.

Ways to Use Patterned Paper in Cardmaking

DESIGN NOTES:

  • On this card, the two pieces of designer paper serve as a way to draw the eye in to the card focal point.
  • TIPS FOR USING TWO PIECES OF PATTERNED PAPER:  My best advice for using two pieces of paper is to start with a coordinated paper collection.  These paper collections are designed to take the guesswork out of coordinating products.  In this case, I used two pieces from the Naturally Eclectic Designer Series Paper pack (144185).

I hope you have enjoyed learning about ways to use patterned paper in cardmaking.   As I mentioned above, Stampin’ Up! is having a great sale on select Designer Series Paper packs during the month of October. Click here to get details of the sale.   Or, if you prefer, go and check out the paper in my online store.

 

Four Hour Warning!!

By | October 4, 2017

Only FOUR HOURS until my first 12 Weeks of Christmas project is sent to my email subscribers.

Have you signed up to receive them??

12 Weeks of Christmas BeeBug Creations
We’re down to the final hours.  You won’t want to miss even one week of my FREE projects.  But, the only way to get these ideas is to be on my mailing list by 1pm TODAY!!

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How to Change a Card Sketch Layout

By | October 4, 2017

Card sketches are great tools to use when planning and creating handmade cards.  Today I’d like to talk about how to change a card sketch layout and I’ve got two cards to share as an illustration.

If you’ve been a reader of my blog for awhile, you’ll know that in the past I’ve done many blog posts on using card sketches.  They are a go-to tool in my card making tool box.  (If you’d like to see my other posts on this topic, use the search tool in my sidebar and type in the terms Card Sketches and Card Layouts.)

The two cards I’m sharing today use many of the same elements.  However, with a few additions and changes, you can come up with a new twist that looks like a different card!!

Here’s my first card.  This was my original card.  It’s fairly simple to make because we made it at my recent open house (and there isn’t time for complicated at that event!).

How to Change a Card Sketch Layout

I had extra card kits left after the event that I wanted to use.  I also needed to make some Thanksgiving cards for our church to send to our sponsored missionaries.  That brought up the question of  how to change a card sketch layout!!

 

Here’s what I came up with.

How to Change a Card Sketch Layout

Notice how the overall card layout is exactly the same as the first.  My second card even uses the exact same featured element.  However, I changed the words and shape of the sentiment (a retired Stampin’ Up! stamp and punch), moved it to the left, and added some additional stamped elements.  Now, even though many of the elements are the same, I have two very different cards using the same layout!!

 

Sometimes we think we need to come up with a new idea each time we make a card.  As you can see from my two cards today, that simply isn’t true!!  Here’s my challenge to you today.  Find a card layout that you like and create a card with it.  Then, figure out how to change a card sketch layout by changing the card elements to make an entirely different card.

P.S. If you’d like to see other cards I made using the Pick a Pumpkin stamp set, you can find them here.

24 Hours Till 12 Weeks of Christmas!!

By | October 3, 2017

My first 12 Weeks of Christmas newsletter project will be sent in just 24 HOURS!!!

Will you receive it??

12 Weeks of Christmas BeeBug Creations

My newsletter subscribers LOVE the FREE holiday projects that I send out every Wednesday.  The ONLY way to get ALL 12 projects is to be subscribed to my newsletter mailing list by 1pm TOMORROW…Wednesday, October 3. 
Don’t miss out!!
I hope you will be one of my reader’s receiving all the great ideas I have to share!

Subscribe to my mailing list here.

How to Layer Elements on Handmade Cards

By | October 2, 2017

Do you struggle with knowing how to layer elements on your card projects?  Well, today I’m going to share some tips about how to layer elements on handmade cards.  The card projects I’m sharing use the Pick A Pumpkin Bundle (Wood 146024, Clear 146025) from the current Stampin’ Up! Holiday Catalog.  This is a great bundle to use for fall themed cards…Halloween, Thanksgiving, thinking of you, birthdays…you get the idea.

How to layer elements on handmade cards:

  • Layering is exactly what it sounds like – placing different card elements on top of each other to achieved a “layered” look.
  • Layering adds texture and depth to your handmade cards without requiring any special tools or supplies.
  • Layering helps direct the eye towards the focal point of your project.  It also contributes to the overall project theme.
  • On the projects I’m sharing today, I used a clustering technique – layering the elements together in one area to create a focal point.
  • Overlapping the card elements creates the feeling of depth and dimension.

Here’s my first card project.

How to Layer Elements on Handmade Cards

DESIGN NOTES:

  • Colors: Pumpkin Pie and Tranquil Tide
  • Sentiment stamp: Labels to Love (Wood 144970, Clear 144967)
  • Border: Very Vanilla 1/2″ Lace Trim (141672)
  • I used the Leaf Punch (144667) to make the Tranquil Tide leaves.
  • Dimensions of focal piece: Very Vanilla 3 3/4″ x 2 1/4″; Tranquil Tide 4″ x 2 1/2″
  • LAYERING TIP: Decide where sentiment will be placed in relation to the layered elements.  On this card the elements fit from top to bottom, so the logical place for the sentiment is on the right.  Notice where I placed the sentiments on my other cards.

 

My second card project uses a circle for the focal piece instead of a rectangle.

How to Layer Elements on Handmade Cards

DESIGN NOTES:

  • Colors: Cajun Craze, Tangerine Tango, Crushed Curry
  • Sentiment: Window Shopping (Wood 142920, Clear 143265)
  • Background Designer Paper: Painted Autumn (144613)
  • Used for the circles: Layering Circles Framelits (141705) and Stitched Shapes Framelits (145372).
  • LAYERING TIP: Decide which images will be in front and which will be in back.  Usually the larger, taller elements are in the back.  Notice how some of the elements extend beyond the edge of the circle.  This adds interest and movement.

 

Here’s the third card project.

How to Layer Elements on Handmade Cards

DESIGN NOTES:

  • Colors: Pumpkin Pie, Crushed Curry, Old Olive
  • Sentiment: Basket of Wishes stamp set (142200)
  • Background strip: Painted Autumn Designer Paper (same as above card)
  • Dimensions of focal piece: Very Vanilla 3 1/2″ x 3″ ; Old Olive 3 3/4″ x 3 1/4″
  • LAYERING TIP: An image stamped on the background piece can also be used as part of the layering cluster.  

 

Here’s my final project for today.

How to Layer Elements on Handmade Cards

DESIGN NOTES:

  • Colors: Pumpkin Pie, Old Olive, Crushed Curry
  • Sentiment: Best Birds stamp set (141525)
  • Dimensions of focal piece: Very Vanilla 4 3/4″ x 3 1/2″; Pumpkin Pie 5″ x 3 3/4″
  • LAYERING TIP: Make sure to use some solid color cardstock die cut pieces along with the stamped images.  The dies in the Patterned Pumpkins Thinlits Dies set (144670) are perfect for adding interest to the layered cluster!!

 

One last thing to notice about today’s projects is that they are all different from one another even though each  used many of the same elements and color combinations. I hope you can see how you can use just one stamp set to create many different cards!!  After all, we want to get the greatest value from the stamp sets we invest in!!

 

Did you learn anything new about how to layer elements on handmade cards?  I hope so.  My sincere desire is that this blog can be a resource that helps you to become a better card maker.  If this post was helpful, please help me out by sharing it on social media using one of the buttons below this post.  Thanks!

 

Designer Series Paper Sale

By | October 1, 2017

Let’s admit it: we all LOVE gorgeous Designer Series Paper!! So, by popular demand, Stampin’ Up! is bringing back an incredible Designer Series Paper offer. During October, buy three packages of select Designer Series Paper and get one FREE! This sale includes Designer Series Paper from both the annual and holiday catalogs. And select Specialty and Designer Series Paper Stacks are included in the sale!  Click here to shop the designer series paper sale.

Here’s what’s included:

Celebrate World Cardmaking Day!

By | October 1, 2017

World Card Making Day is a day dedicated to doing what you love most—making handmade cards! It celebrates the creativity and personal connection handmade cards create between loved ones, and it’s a great time to celebrate by making your own cards to send to family and friends.

This year the world celebrates the day on October 7, but one day wasn’t enough for Stampin’ Up! For ten days (October 1–10), you can get 15% off Notecards & Envelopes and select stamp sets. Also, when you buy Fast Fuse Adhesive, you’ll get two refills for FREE!   So, take some time to celebrate the best hobby of all—cardmaking!

 

PLEASE NOTE:  The Fast Fuse deal is no longer available. It was SO POPULAR that Stampin’ Up! sold a two year supply in just days!! To help make it up to you, SU will bring back the same offer on Fast Fuse for five days within the next few months, after they have sufficient Fast Fuse back in stock. Thanks for your understanding!!

 

 

See below for all the products on special during this promotion.  You can purchase any of the items in my online store.

 

 

12 Weeks of Christmas Coming Soon!!

By | September 27, 2017

My annual 12 Weeks of Christmas newsletter will begin one week from today.

12 Weeks of Christmas BeeBug Creations

Each week (for 12 weeks) subscribers will receive emails containing handmade holiday project ideas including cards, gifts, bags and tags.  Step by step directions to complete each project are also included.

I love giving this annual gift to my mailing list subscribers and I am excited to share these projects with you!!   However, the only way to receive ALL 12 of these amazing projects is to make sure that you are signed up for my newsletter mailing list by next Wednesday, October 4 at 1pm.

Click here to subscribe.

We’ll see you next week!!

 

Handmade Snowflake Themed Greeting Cards

By | September 27, 2017

Handmade snowflake themed greeting cards are one of my favorite types of holiday/winter cards to create.  They make great Christmas cards, but you can also adapt them for any other occasion you may need (birthdays, thinking of you, etc).  Stampin’ Up! has some lovely snowflake themed products in their current 2107 Holiday Catalog and I’d like to share some cards made with those products. 

 

This first card is a quick and easy one to create.

Handmade Snowflake Themed Greeting Cards

DESIGN NOTES:

  • If you make LOTS of holiday cards, this is a great card layout idea to use.  It uses a 2 1/4″ x 4 1/2″ piece of designer paper.  The matte sizes are: 4 3/4″ x 2 1/2″;  5″ x 2 3/4″
  • The snowflake designer paper is in the Year of Cheer Specialty Designer Series Paper (144640).
  • Sentiment is from the Snowflake Sentiments stamp set (Wood 144817, Clear 144820).
  • I used the Stitched Shapes Framelits (145372) and Layering Ovals Framelits (141706) to create the oval pieces.
  • Colors: Smoky Slate, Dapper Denim, Silver Foil.

 

Continuing on with more handmade snowflake themed greeting cards here’s my second card:

Handmade Snowflake Themed Greeting Cards

DESIGN NOTES:

  • This card also uses the Year of Cheer Specialty Designer Series Paper.  Sizes for the two pieces: snowflakes = 3″ x 5 1/2″; plaid 1 1/4″ x 5 1/2″
  • The gold foil snowflakes (144642) are a great way to disguise the seam between the two papers.  I cut the snowflake in half, and then cut one of the halves in half to get the snowflakes on the edge.
  • Sentiment is embossed with Gold Embossing Powder (109129).  You can find the greeting in the Merry Mistletoe stamp set (Wood 143650, Clear 143655).
  • 1/8″ Gold Ribbon (134583) is used as an accent.

 

Here’s my third snowflake themed card.

Handmade Snowflake Themed Greeting Cards

DESIGN NOTES:

  • This card is full of sparkle and shine!!  Besides the Foil Snowflakes,  it uses a Champagne Foil Sheet (144748) on the card front.  This foil paper is absolutely GORGEOUS!!!  It adds a touch of elegance to ANY project.
  • The sparkle bow is tied using a piece of silver Mini Tassel Trim (144636).
  • You will find the greeting in the Snowflake Sentiments stamp set.
  • The scallop circles are cut with the Layering Circles Framelits Dies (141705).

 

As you can see, any of these handmade snowflake themed greeting cards would easily be adapted to ANY occasion where a card is needed.  And, none of the cards is difficult to make.  Have you started to think about creating your holiday cards??  Why not use one of these card layouts??

Color Blocking Technique for Handmade Cards

By | September 25, 2017

Today I’m exploring the color blocking technique for handmade cards.  Color blocking involves combining colors opposite each other on the color wheel.  These are called “complimentary colors”.  The colors are then paired together to make interesting color combinations.

Color blocking originated in the fashion world.  It has since spread into the areas of interior design and home decor.  We also see it used in the papercrafting world as well.

Here’s a card I created using the color blocking technique for handmade cards.

Color Blocking Technique for Handmade CardsDESIGN NOTES:

  • The “striped” block behind the maple leaf is an example of a “color block”.  I used blue and red as contrasting colors.  Technically, they aren’t directly across from one another on the wheel, but their difference in color works for a contrast.
  • I added a neutral color (Smokey Slate) between the two colors for more of a contrast in the color block.
  • To create the “block”, attach the color strips to a piece of scrap Whisper White cardstock.  You will see how I did this in the photo below.
  • Notice, the color blocks run at an angle.  Here’s a photo of how I created that effect.

Color Blocking Technique for Handmade Cards

 

Of course, because I can’t let anything go to waste, I created a second card with the leftover square cut-out.  Here’s that card.

Color Blocking Technique for Handmade Cards

DESIGN NOTES:

  • The color blocking on this card is the background piece.
  • Center lined image is from the Hello Color stamp set (Wood 143943, Clear 143946).  I didn’t color the entire image, but just filled in some of the lines.

 

I hope you enjoyed learning about the color blocking technique for handmade cards.  Is this a technique that you’d like to try??  If so, what colors would you choose to use on your project??

Add Color to Embossing Folders with Sponges

By | September 20, 2017

It’s easy to add color to embossing folders with sponges. I love quick and easy cardmaking techniques and this one certainly fits that criteria!!  Plus, it gives you an additional way to use embossing folders you probably already own, and I always like to find more ways to use tools I’ve invested in.

This technique is a great way to make the embossed cardstock on your project stand out.  Each sponged embossed piece will turn out differently and the color combination ideas are endless.

September’s here so I chose a fall theme for today’s cards.  The background on each card was made in the exact same manner.  The only difference was which side of the embossing folder I sponged with ink.  I used the Petal Burst Textured Impressions Embossing Folder (141493) on both my cards.

Here’s my first card.

Add Color to Embossing Folders with Sponges

DESIGN NOTES:

  • You can really see the sponged embossed background on this clean and simple birthday card.  Doesn’t the sponging add a whole new dimension to the embossing?
  • The “line” side of the embossing folder was inked to get this look.  You can tell this because the petals are recessed.  (This is the side WITH Sizzix and the Stampin’ Up! logo.)
  • I used a really light hand when adding the ink to the folder.  If you want a darker look, you would add more ink.  Experiment to find the look you want.
  • Sentiment on this card is from the Better Together stamp set (Wood 141733, Clear 141736).

 

Here’s the second card, and you can see how different the background looks.

Add Color to Embossing Folders with Sponges

DESIGN NOTES:

  • The “flat” side of the embossing folder was inked to create this background. You can tell because the petals “pop” up from the background.  (This is the side WITHOUT Sizzix and the Stampin’ Up! logo.)
  • The ink transfers to the paper a bit darker when using this side of the embossing folder.
  • Stamps used: Rose Wonder (140697); Flower Shop (Wood 130939, Clear 130942)

 

Here are some more tips to use when you add color to embossing folders with sponges.

  • Use several colors that will blend well together and apply them randomly without overlapping.  TIP: I use one Sponge piece (cut into wedges like a pie) or one Sponge Dauber for each color.  I label my sponges so I know which colors are which.
  • You’ll need to clean your folder between inking each piece of cardstock.  Otherwise, you will contaminate your ink pads with the wrong colors.
  • TIP: The fastest and easiest way I’ve found to clean folders is to simply rinse them under tap water and blot dry with a towel.

 

Last spring I shared a series of blog posts on different ways to use embossing folders in your cardmaking.  Check it out.  At the end of the post, I have links to the other embossing folder technique posts in the series.

 

I hope have enjoyed learning how to add color to embossing folders with sponges.

Handmade Sunflower Greeting Cards with Painted Harvest

By | September 18, 2017

Fall is here…and when I think of fall, I think of sunflowers. I have two handmade sunflower greeting cards with painted harvest stamp set (144783) from Stampin’ Up!  You can find this fun to use stamp set in the new 2017 Holiday catalog.

It’s easy to make handmade sunflower greeting cards with painted harvest stamp set.  This is a two-step stamp set, which means you create the stamped images with two different stamps.  First stamp with the less detailed stamp using a lighter color ink.  Next, stamp the detailed stamp over the first stamped image using a darker shade of the same color.

I stuck with the traditional yellow and brown colors of a sunflower on my cards.  But, the flower image in this stamp set can be stamped in a variety of colors!!!

 

Here’s my first card.  This was designed by Shari Caspers.  We made this card at one of her downline meetings.

Handmade Sunflower Greeting Cards with Painted Harvest

DESIGN NOTES:

  • The boldness of the plaid strip of Merry Little Christmas designer paper (144621) serves to immediately catch the eye and draw it in.
  • Notice how perfectly the Starburst punch (143717) fits around the flower image.  It makes “cutting” the sunflower easy, eliminating the fussy cutting!!
  • Leaf images were cut with the coordinating Leaf Punch (144667).
  • Flower colors: Crushed Curry, Chocolate Chip, Garden Green.

 

Here’s a second handmade sunflower greeting cards with painted harvest.  I found the cutting inspiration for the flower on Mitosu Crafts blog.

Handmade Sunflower Greeting Cards with Painted Harvest

DESIGN NOTES:

  • Can you guess which die I used to cut the sunflower on this card??  The versatile Eastern Medallions Thinlits dies set (143725)!!
  • The sentiment is from the Birthday Blooms stamp set (Wood 140655, Clear 140658).  Notice how perfectly it fits in the new Everyday Label Punch (144668).  In my opinion, this is a must-have punch to add to your crafting tools!!
  • Textured background design is made using the Garden Trellis Textured Impressions Embossing Folder (143741).
  • Flower colors:  Daffodil Delight and Crushed Curry; Lemon-Lime Twist and Garden Green, Soft Suede.

 

The Painted Harvest stamp set is versatile.  It’s a stamp set I think you’ll find yourself returning to again and again.  The stamp set is bundled with the coordinating Leaf Punch, at a 10% discount.  If you are interested in purchasing this bundle, you can find it here in my online store.  Both the stamp set and punch can also be purchased separately.

What do you think of the handmade sunflower greeting cards with painted harvest?  It’s a great set to use for creating beautiful, easy-to-make cards.